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Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 101 Introductory Psychology I
3 Credits

This course provides learners with an introduction to theories, concepts, and research findings in psychology. Specific topics covered include methods of psychological research, psychobiology, sensation, perception, consciousness, human development, learning and habit formation, and memory. Some practical applications of these topics for the learners' personal lives and careers are also introduced. Whenever possible learners will be encouraged to engage in cross-cultural analyses of psychological phenomenon through an Indigenous lens.

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide

PSYC 102 Introductory Psychology II
3 Credits

Continuation of PSYC 101. The classes include lectures, structured experiences, discussions and audiovisual presentations aimed at familiarizing the students with current psychological views. The specific topics this semester are: memory, cognition, motivation, emotion, stress, personality, psychopathology, therapy and social psychology. (3,0,0)

Prerequisites
English 12 or equivalent

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide

PSYC 201 Developmental Psychology I
3 Credits

If you would like to gain some insight into your own history and want to know more about what your life will be like as you grow through the adult years, the study of life-span development will be of interest to you. This is the first half of a two-semester second-year elective course in psychology. Following an introduction to methods and theories and a review of genetics and prenatal development we will examine development in infancy, early childhood and middle childhood, from a physical, cognitive and psychosocial point of view. The focus will be on the normal process growing but some potential developmental problems will be discussed. Classes consist of lectures, discussions, audiovisual presentations and structured experiences. Learning Outcomes:

Prerequisites
PSYC 101 or PSYC 102

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide

PSYC 202 Developmental Psychology Ii
3 Credits

The study of lifespan development will help you gain insight into your own history and learn more about what your life will be like as you grow through the adult years. This is the second half of a two-semester course in lifespan developmental psychology which examines physical, cognitive, and socio-emotional development of adolescence, and early, middle, and late adulthood. This course includes a discussion of death, dying, and bereavement. The focus is on the normal process of development; however, whenever relevant, atypical development is discussed. Whenever possible, the influence of culture and diversity on development throughout the lifespan is examined.

Prerequisites
Take PSYC-101 PSYC-102

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide

PSYC 203 Psychology of Gender and Gender Relation
3 Credits

This course introduces students to the psychology of gender, gender differences and differences in the experiences and behaviours of males and females.

Prerequisites
PSYC 101 and PSYC 102

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide

PSYC 205 Psyc of Drugs & Chem Addiction
3 Credits

This course surveys topics related to the effects of drugs on behaviour and chemical addiction. Specific topics will include neurological effects of drugs, the causes and circumstances of addiction and the prevention and treatment of addiction. Classes of drugs studied will include alcohol, marijuana, stimulants, opiates, tranquilizers, nicotine, hallucinogens, antidepressants and antipsychotics.

Prerequisites
PSYC 101 and PSYC 102

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide

PSYC 206 Intro to Health Psychology
3 Credits

Following an introduction and a review of methods and theories, learners will examine biological perspectives on health and disease. Then learners will engage the themes of stress and coping, and links among determinants of health including socioeconomic status, early life adversity, physical environments, and access to healthcare. In addition, various factors contributing to health such as personality, race, social support, diet, fitness, and chronic pain will be examined. Other topics include death, dying, grief, and bereavement. Lastly, learners carefully examine how the field of positive psychology may promote health outcomes. Whenever possible, the influence of culture and diversity on health is examined.

Prerequisites
PSYC 101 and PSYC 102

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide

PSYC 207 Intro to Mental Health Counselling
3 Credits

The most influential psychotherapies will be introduced with particular emphasis on behavioural and cognitive interventions. Issues of evidence based counseling, multicultural counseling, and legal-ethical oblications will also be introduced.

Prerequisites
PSYC 101 and PSYC 102

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide

PSYC 208 Social Psychology
3 Credits

Humans need to belong to a social group, and to live and work for, and with others. We are influenced by others and try to influence others in turn. Following an introduction to the course, and a review of social cognition and studies of the self, learners examine topics such as attitudes, persuasion, confirming, roles, attraction, aggression, and altruism. Additional topics include: group dynamics, competition, cooperation, prejudice, and discrimination. The emphasis is on an examination of how humans behave under a certain social influence and in a certain situation. Whenever possible, effects of culture and diversity on a group of individuals are examined.

Prerequisites
TAKE PSYC-101 OR PSYC-102

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide

PSYC 215 Research Methods in Social Sciences I
3 Credits

This course is an introduction to research methods in psychology and/or the social sciences. The course starts with a review of what constitutes ethical research and the fundamentals of research design. Then, various methods are examined with special attention to their characteristics, strengths, and limitations. In addition, the advantages and limitations of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research strategies are discussed. The course also covers how to interpret, generalize and critique research findings. Moreover, reporting on research findings orally as well as in writing is practiced. Whenever possible, the influence of culture and diversity on research design and results are explored.

Prerequisites
PSYC 101 and PSYC 102

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide

PSYC 216 Research Methods in Social Sciences II
3 Credits

Prerequisites
PSYC 101/102

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide

PSYC 221 Abnormal Psyc and Therapy I
3 Credits

This is the first half of a two-semester course for students who are interested in learning about psychological disorders and therapy. We will examine the causes, diagnosis, assessment, symptoms, treatment and possible prevention of psychological disorders: including historical and current theoretical perspectives, classification systems, cultural perspectives and legal/ethical issues. Examples of topics may include: anxiety disorders, depressive disorders, dissociative disorders and personality disorders.

Prerequisites
PSYC 101 or 102

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide

PSYC 222 Abnormal Psyc & Therapy II
3 Credits

This is the second half of a two-semester course for students who are interested in learning more about psychological disorders and therapy. This course is designed to introduce the learner to abnormal psychology. We will examine the causes, diagnosis, assessment, symptoms, treatment and possible prevention of psychological disorders: including historical and current theoretical perspectives, classification systems, cultural perspectives and legal/ethical issues. Examples of topics may include: feeding and eating disorders, addiction, sexual dysfunctions, schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorder, and anxiety and depression in childhood and adolescence.

Prerequisites
PSYC 101/102 and PSYC 221

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide

PSYC 232 Research Methods in Psychology
3 Credits

Introduction to basic research methods in psychology or the social sciences. Emphasis will be on the procedures and underlying logic of scientific inquiry. Topics include hypothesis testing, behavioural or psychological measurement, experimental and quasi-experimental designs, survey research, the relative advantages and limitations of quantitative and qualitative research strategies, and how to critically interpret research findings. (3,1.5,0)

Prerequisites
PSYC 101/102

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide

PSYC 233 Historical and Conceptual Foundations of Psychology
3 Credits

Prerequisites
PSYC 101/102

Transfer Credits
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PSYC 240 Forensic Psychology
3 Credits

This course explores the interface between psychology and the criminal justice system. Participants investigate, evaluate, and apply psychological research to the criminal justice system (police, courts, corrections).

Prerequisites
PSYC 101 and 102

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide

PSYC 245 Psychology of Culture
3 Credits

This course examines how culture affects behaviours and mental processes. The course starts with an introduction to cultural psychology, followed by a review of research methods. By examining cultural variations in such constructs as development, socialization, the self, personality, relationships, cognition, perception, emotions, morality, religion and health, learners can realize the strong link between culture and psychology. Other topics include how cultures change over time, living in multicultural worlds, and cultural themes relating to organizations, leadership, and justice. Whenever possible, learners will be encouraged to engage in cross-cultural analyses of psychological phenomena through an Indigenous lens.

Prerequisites
PSYC-101 and PSYC-102

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide

PSYC 260 Psychology of Religion and Spirituality
3 Credits

This course explores how religious belief and spiritual experience (and their absence) mold our behaviours and psychological processes. The course starts with an introduction to psychology of religion and spiritualty, followed by a review of Indigenous spirituality and research methods. Then pioneers in the field and spiritual experiences are examined. Additional critical topics include: personality factors, health and well-being, religions organizations, and social attitudes and religion. Whenever possible learners will be encouraged to engage in cross-cultural analyses of psychological phenomenon through an Indigenous lens.

Prerequisites
PSYC-101 and PSYC-102

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide