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First Nations Studies (FNST)

FNST 050 Provincial First Nations Studies
4 Credits

Prerequisites
English 11 or equivalent

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide

FNST 101 Introductory to First Nations Studies
3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the multidisciplinary field of First Nations Studies and its nature and goals as an academic discipline. From identifities, voices, communities, cultures, histories, values, beliefs, languages, oral traditions, literature, and art. Relationships between culture, language and land will also be examined. The course also introduces students to the important historical, cultural, social and political realities that have and continue to impact the lives of Aboriginal peoples in Canada.

Prerequisites
English 12 or equivalent

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide

FNST 110 Ethnobotany: Plants & First People
3 Credits

Plants have always been essential for human survival and well-being. We rely on them for food, materials, medicines and their spiritual values. Because plants are so important, we have given many of them special names, and have developed stories and ceremonies that highlight their special qualities. For Indigenous peoples in northern British Columbia, there is a wealth of knowledge, practice and belief around plants. The role of plants in Indigenous lifeways will be the topic of this course. Through lectures, readings, demonstrations and hands-on lab experiences, the students will have an opportunity to investigate the complex roles of plants in human cultures. Ethnobotany has been a subject for academic and scientific study for just over a century, but knowledge about plants goes far back in human history. In this course we will study the integration of scientific botanical knowledge and Indigenous knowledge about plants founded in practice and tradition. Students will learn about the scientific method and the fundamentals of biology and ecology in relation to the student of plants and how Indigenous knowledge and approaches can complement academic science.

Prerequisites
English 12 or equivalent

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide

FNST 120 Aboriginal Languages - Preservation and Revitalization
3 Credits

This course examines protocols, planning strategies and methods for data collection, analysis, and organization appropriate for language preservation and revitalization of Aboriginal languages. Students will learn strategies and practical methods for community-based projects such as: intellectual and cultural property, gathering of language materials, digital recording and editing, documenting language (literacy and orthography), and ways to deliver the materials to the community.

Prerequisites
English 12 or equivalent

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide

FNST 200 Aboriginal Community Research
3 Credits

This course will provide a basis in the theory and practice of Aboriginal community research. While it is not intended to provide intensive training in order to carry out research, students will be provided with an overview of a variety of research methodologies and methods, as well as an introduction to planning a research study. The history of research on, for, and with Aboriginal peoples will be examined, as will the ethical issues involved when working with Aboriginal communities. By the end of the course, students will be able to articulate what makes up an Indigenous research paradigm.

Prerequisites
FNST 101 and FNST 120

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide

FNST 210 Aboriginal Health: Community Wellness & Healing
3 Credits

This course provides students with an overview of Aboriginal health, wellness, and well-being from an Aboriginal worldview, which encompasses physical, mental, emotional and spiritual factors. The course is premised on the understanding that connection to land, traditional medicine, spirituality, traditional foods, traditional activities, and language are key factors influencing the health and wellness of Aboriginal peoples. Students are introduced to traditional Aboriginal healing practices, which are seen to be a way to restore physical, mental, emotional and spiritual balance to the lives of individuals, families, and communities. Colonization and assimilation policies and their effect on the health of Aboriginal peoples will also be examined.

Prerequisites
FNST 101

Transfer Credits
Explore transfer credit opportunities by visiting the BC Transfer Guide